/img/research/mi/printable/printable-atc-logo.png http://images.autotrader.com/scaler/600/450/pictures/model_info/Images_Fleet_US_EN/All/1776.jpg

2002 Dodge Durango Sport Utility

4dr Sport

Starting at | Starting at 14 MPG City - 19 MPG Highway

/img/research/mi/printable/rating-0.png 0

Avg. consumer rating

Rate & Review
Find It Near You

Prices & Offers

Please enter your ZIP code to see local prices, special offers and listings near you.

  • Average Retail is not available
  • $25,400 original MSRP
Printable Version

2002 Dodge Durango Sport Utility

Printable Version

2002 Dodge Durango Sport Utility

Display:
Select:

2002 Dodge Durango

Source: New Car Test Drive

Introduction

Dodge Durango is handsome, powerful, versatile, and refined. For many buyers, however, Durango's most appealing feature is its just-right size. Based on the Dakota pickup, Durango is smaller and more maneuverable than the full-size SUVs, such as the Ford Expedition and Chevrolet Tahoe. Yet Durango still offers six-passenger seating, V8 power, and a hefty towing capacity. Dodge Durango has found a comfortable niche that Ford and GM missed.

With theater-style seating that gives rear-seat passengers a view of the road ahead, and other interior creature comforts, the Durango is a smart choice for large families. It's also a good choice for people who tow light to medium-sized trailers. A beefy 5.9-liter V8 is available, and it delivers plenty of pulling power, while the more sophisticated 4.7-liter overhead-cam V8 offers decent performance and an added measure of refinement.

A new five-speed automatic transmission is available for 2002 that should improve fuel economy.

Also new for 2002 are optional side-curtain air bags ($495), available for every trim level. For 2002, Dodge has added a high-value trim level called SXT with unique Graphite trim. Last year, Durango benefited from an all-new, more comfortable and more car-like interior, plus a new performance-tuned R/T model.

Model Lineup

Durango is available with two-wheel drive and four-wheel drive. Two engines are available: a 4.7-liter V8 and a 5.9-liter V8.

Five trim levels are available. Sport ($25,100) and Sport 4WD ($27,220) feature color-keyed trim, 15-inch alloy wheels, AM/FM/cassette stereo, and many other luxuries as standard equipment.

New for 2002, is the SXT ($26,995), with unique Graphite exterior trim, 16-inch alloy wheels, a roof rack, and a CD player.

SLT ($29,320) and SLT 4WD ($31,440) feature power seats, fog lights, a separate rear-compartment heater, compact disc changer, and a chrome grille.

SLT Plus ($31,930) and SLT Plus 4WD ($34,050) add leather upholstery, an overhead console, Infinity sound system, leather-wrapped steering wheel, color-coordinated running boards, and heated mirrors.

R/T ($36,620) is a performance model that combines the 245-horsepower 5.9-liter V8 with a higher numerical rear axle ratio, a limited-slip rear differential and sport-tuned exhaust to yield quicker off-the line acceleration. Four-wheel drive is standard. Seventeen-inch wheels with 275/60R17 tires and a sport-tuned suspension improve handling, while body-colored wheel flares help set the R/T apart.

Walkaround

Dodge Durango doesn't look like other SUVs. It makes a bolder statement with its muscular styling. It looks sportier than the Ford or GM competition and many of the imports. Durango shares its front end with the Dakota pickup. The grille's prominent bull's-eye slats instantly identify this SUV as part of the Dodge family.

Interior Features

Eight people can fit in the Durango (six comfortably), with theater seating designed to give everyone a view out the front. The back half of the roof is raised nearly two inches to increase rear-seat headroom and visibility. This raised portion is cleverly disguised with a roof rack.

Second-row seats are quite comfortable, offering plenty of headroom and adequate legroom. Stable cup holders and rear heating/air conditioning controls add to comfort. Third-row seats (standard in SLT, SLT Plus, and R/T) are surprisingly comfortable for two people, who enjoy adequate legroom by tucking their feet under the second-row seats in front of them. Getting in and out of that third row is easy: Flip a lever and the second-row seatback folds forward, then tumbles out of the way, allowing a quick entry or exit.

Durango's interior was re-designed for 2001, including a new instrument panel, interior trim, center and overhead consoles, carpeting and steering wheel. A dual-zone climate control system is standard, and SLT and R/T models provide auxiliary heat for the third-row seats.

When it's time to haul cargo, the tailgate lifts up and out of the way, and the two rows of seats easily fold down to provide a large, relatively flat floor. A trout bum could sleep back there. All Durangos have a long, narrow storage compartment under the floor just inside the rear liftgate, with enough space for the jack, flares and other roadside equipment.

Overall, the interior design is executed well. Our SLT Plus came with tan leather accented in attractive suede. Matching plastic trim provides an organic appearance. The seats appear plain, but they are comfortable. Carpeting extends to the backs of the rear headrests, which do not have to be removed when the seats are folded down. That's a convenient, timesaving feature.

The driving position is comfortable, with good visibility over an attractive, rounded hoodline. Instruments are big and easy to read, although the speedometer appears busy with has marks for every 2-1/2 mph. Power outside mirrors are easy to adjust with a big knob on the driver's door. Cup-holders and storage trays are nicely designed, while a digital compass and other useful readouts beckon from overhead. Large buttons on the leather-wrapped steering wheel operate one of the better cruise controls we've encountered.

Driving Impressions

The Durango is enjoyable to drive. Equipped with the big 5.9-liter Magnum V8, it always feels willing to get down the road quickly, with excellent throttle response and quick acceleration. Shifting is smooth and responsive and transmission ratios are well matched to the healthy torque of the 5.9-liter V8.

It handles well when driven briskly down narrow roads with tight corners and sweeping turns. The Durango feels a bit sportier than other sport-utilities, particularly the bigger ones. Steering is precise and the suspension provides excellent transient response, responding crisply when dodging quickly from left to right and back again. On unpaved roads, the Durango provides predictable handling. We never bottomed the suspension out in spite of bouncing around in the rough stuff.

Durango's competent off-road capability and on-road handling response don't come as a free lunch, however. We found ride quality on downtown Washington's crumbling infrastructure a bit on the harsh side. The Durango should be fine for most folks, but it's something to note on your test drive. Ride quality on rough pavement is not as smooth as it is in, say, the new Ford Explorer or GMC Envoy.

As mentioned, two V8 engines are available. Unless you plan to tow, we recommend the more modern 4.7-liter overhead-cam engine over the older 5.9-liter V8.

The sophisticated 4.7-liter V8 was a clean-sheet design for 2000. It uses a modern overhead-cam configuration, as opposed to the 5.9-liter engine's traditional overhead-valve design. Rated 235 horsepower and 295 foot-pounds of torque, the 4.7 still meets California's low emissions vehicle (LEV) standards, and returns an EPA-certified 14/19 mpg with 2WD and four-speed automatic.

The 4.7 was designed and engineered in tandem with an innovative four-speed automatic transmission that features two second-gear ratios. Engine and transmission talk to each other and choose the optimum ratio based on driver input and load conditions. Most often, it will choose the numerically higher ratio when starting off from rest, or when towing; and a numerically lower ratio as a more ideal kick-down or passing gear.

New for 2002, is a similarly engineered five-speed automatic, with two overdrive ratios and again two different second-gear ratios. The five-speed automatic adds a new top gear onto the four-speed automatic's ratios that should improve fuel economy on the highway.

The big 5.9-liter Magnum V8 generates 245 horsepower and 335 foot-pounds of torque. That's considerably more robust than the just-released 2003 Expedition's standard 4.6-liter overhead-cam V8 (232 horsepower and 291 pound-feet of torque), and not far behind Expedition's optional 5.4-liter unit, with its 260 horsepower and 350 pound-feet. The Dodge 5.9-liter V8 also compares favorably with the Chevrolet Tahoe's 5.3-liter V8 (285 horsepower, but only 325 pound-feet of torque). Fuel economy for the 5.9-liter Dodge is 12/17 mpg city/highway, as rated by the EPA. The Durango can nearly tow with the big boys, too. With the 5.9-liter engine and 3.92 axle, it's capable of pulling a 7,550-pound trailer. Chevy's Tahoe is rated to pull 7,900 pounds, and Ford's Expedition is rated for 8,900 pounds. Ford's larger-for-2002 Explorer can pull a maximum of 7,300 pounds.

Four-wheel-drive Durangos offer a choice of two different transfer cases: a traditional part-time system for serious outdoors people, and a full-time system that's better for road use in changing weather conditions. Both transfer cases rely on shift-on-the-fly lever mounted on the floor. Without stopping, slide the silky transfer box into part-time four-wheel drive and you're ready to bound through sandy gullies or deep mud. We'd feel comfortable driving a Durango anywhere.

A part-time four-wheel-drive transfer case is standard. Shifting from two-wheel drive into part-time four-wheel drive is only appropriate for mud, snow and other low-traction situations. It's not suitable for dry pavement as there is no speed differential between the front and rear wheels, and the tires will hop and chatter in tight parking-lot maneuvers. Durango's part-time four-wheel-drive system is a good choice for people who live in a dry climate but want to be able to shift into ultimate off-road mode. On really steep grades, Durango can be shifted into low-range four-wheel drive. Overall, it's the best choice for those who want serious off-road capability.

A more flexible option is the full-time four-wheel-drive transfer case ($395). It comes with everything above plus a planetary center differential, so even in four-wheel mode the front and rear axles can turn at different speeds, and the wheels don't fight each other in tight quarters. Yet traction is assured under all but the worst conditions. Full-time four-wheel-drive mode is appropriate for torrential rain, light snow and ice or light off-highway travel. If conditions should get extreme, the driver can manually lock the planetary differential, so the system emulates a part-time four-wheel drive. The planetary differential locks automatically when you shift into low range.

Summary

Dodge Durango is practical, intelligently designed and easy to operate. It offers more room and better acceleration than the mid-size SUVs. It also compares favorably to the full-size Ford Expedition, Chevrolet Tahoe, and GMC Yukon.

The Durango cuts a distinctive appearance among sport-utility vehicles. It's a good choice for people who want to step out from the crowd.

 

 


Model Line Overview

Model lineup: 2WD Sport ($25,100), SXT ($26,995), SLT ($29,320); SLT Plus ($31,930)
4WD Sport ($27,220), SXT ($29,115), SLT ($31,440); SLT Plus ($34,050); R/T ($36,620)
Engines: 230-hp 4.7-liter sohc 16-valve V8; 245-hp 5.9-liter ohv 16-valve V8
Transmissions: 4-speed automatic, 5-speed automatic
Safety equipment (standard): dual front airbags, rear ABS
Safety equipment (optional): side-curtain airbags, four-wheel ABS
Basic warranty: 3 years/50,000 miles
Assembled in: Newark, Delaware

Specifications As Tested

Model tested (MSRP): 4WD SLT Plus ($34,050)
Standard equipment: dual-zone climate control with rear heat, front and rear air conditioning, AM/FM/CD stereo with 8 Infinity speakers, front and rear intermittent wipers, rear defroster, leather-wrapped steering wheel with tilt column, cruise control, power windows, mirrors and locks, remote illuminated keyless entry, rear power outlet, floor mats, roof rack, fog lights, hood insulation, six-way power highback bucket seats, leather seating surfaces, steering-wheel audio controls, overhead console, automatic dimming mirror, dual illuminated visor vanity mirrors, premium door trim, wood grain trim, third-row seat, aluminum wheels, part-time electronically controlled 4WD
Options as tested (MSRP): 5.9-liter Magnum V8 ($595); four-wheel ABS ($495); full-time four-wheel-drive transfer case ($395); limited-slip rear differential ($285)
Destination charge: ($600)
Gas guzzler tax: N/A
Price as tested (MSRP): $36,420
Layout: four-wheel drive
Engine: 5.9-liter ohv 16-valve V8
Horsepower (hp @ rpm): 245 @ 4000
Torque (lb.-ft. @ rpm): 335 @ 3200
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
EPA fuel economy, city/hwy: 12/17 mpg
Wheelbase: 116.2 in.
Length/width/height: 193.5/71.3/72.0 in.
Track, f/r: 62.6/62.9 in.
Turning circle: 37.4 ft.
Seating capacity: 8
Head/hip/leg room, f: 39.8/56.9/41.9 in.
Head/hip/leg room, m: 40.3/55.1/35.4 in.
Head/hip/leg room, r: 37.7/45.2/30.7 in.
Trunk volume: 88.0 cu. ft.
Payload: N/A
Towing capacity: 7300 Lbs.
Suspension, f: Independent
Suspension, r: live axle
Ground clearance: 8.5 in.
Curb weight: 4726 lbs.
Tires: P265/70R-16
Brakes, f/r: disc/drum with ABS
Fuel capacity: 25.0 gal.

 

 

Unless otherwise indicated, specifications refer to test vehicle.
All prices are manufacturer's suggested retail prices (MSRP) effective as of January 02, 2002.
Prices do not include manufacturer's destination and delivery charges. N/A: Information not available or not applicable.
Manufacturer Info Sources: 1-800-4A-DODGE - www.4adodge.com

Copyright © 1994-2003 New Car Test Drive, Inc.


 

Printable Version

2002 Dodge Durango Sport Utility

Safety Ratings help

What do the Safety Ratings mean?

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) performs independent crash testing of new vehicles and then assigns them a score based on their performance. The overall crash test rating is based on how a vehicle performs in the following tests:

Driver Crash Grade:

Measures the chance of a serious injury to a crash test dummy that is placed in a driver's seat and driven into a fixed barrier at 35 MPH. A five-star rating means there is 10 percent or less chance of injury.

Passenger Crash Grade:

Similar to the driver crash grade, only now the focus is on the passenger.

Rollover Resistance:

Simulates an emergency lane change to measure the likelihood of a vehicle rolling over. A five-star rating means there is 10 percent or less risk of rollover.

Side Impact Crash Test - Front:

Focuses on the front side of a vehicle. It simulates crashes that can occur in intersections by striking a 3,015-pound weight against the side of a vehicle at 38.5 MPH. A five-star rating means there is 5 percent or less chance of injury.

Side Impact Crash Test - Rear:

Similar to the front side impact test only now the focus is on the rear passenger.

Driver Crash Grade n/a
Passenger Crash Grade n/a
Rollover Resistance
/img/research/mi/printable/rating-0.png

No consumer rating

Rate & Review
Side Impact Crash Test - Front n/a
Side Impact Crash Test - Rear n/a

Safety Features & Equipment

Braking & Traction

4-Wheel ABS Opt

Passenger Restraint

Driver Air Bag Std
Passenger Air Bag Std
Side Air Bag Opt

Road Visibility

Fog Lamps Opt
Intermittent Wipers Std
Variable Inter. Wipers Std
Printable Version

2002 Dodge Durango Sport Utility

Dodge Certified Pre-Owned Warranty  help
Certified Pre-Owned Warranty
To be eligible for Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) status, vehicles generally must be recent models with relatively low mileage. CPO vehicles must also pass a detailed inspection, outlined by the manufacturer, which is measured by the number of inspected points.
Warranty coverage can vary from one manufacturer to the next. While most certified pre-owned programs transfer and extend the existing new car warranty terms, others offer a warranty that simply represents an additional year and mileage value. Always check with the manufacturer for the specific warranties they offer.
Common features and benefits of Certified Pre-Owned warranties include:
Age/Mileage Eligibility
To even be considered for certification, a car must be a recent model year and have limited mileage. The exact requirements are established by individual manufacturers.
Lease Term Certified
Some manufacturers offer certified pre-owned cars for lease. The length of the lease is often shorter than a new car lease, but it will cost you less.
Point Inspection
These inspections entail a comprehensive vehicle test to ensure that all parts are in excellent working order. The point inspection list is simply a numbered list of exactly what parts of the car are examined. While many inspections range from a 70- to 150-point checklist, most are very similar and are performed using strict guidelines. Ask your local dealer about specific details.
Return/Exchange Program
Some manufacturers offer a very limited return or exchange period. Find out if you will get the sales tax and licensing/registration fees back should you return or exchange the car.
Roadside Assistance
Most certified pre-owned programs offer free roadside service in case your car breaks down while still under warranty.
Special Financing
Reduced-rate loans are available through many certified pre-owned programs. Manufacturer-backed inspections and warranties help eliminate the risks involved with buying pre-owned, so buyers who qualify can take advantage of the great offers.
Transferable Warranty
When a new car warranty transfers with the certification of the car and remains eligible for the next owner, it is known as a transferable warranty. Once the original transferable warranty expires, an extended warranty takes effect.
Warranty Deductible
This is the amount for which you are responsible when repair work is performed under the warranty. Some manufacturers require a deductible while others don't, so always ask.

7-Years/100,000-Miles (whichever comes first). Powertrain Limited Warranty runs from the date vehicle was sold as new.

3-Month/3,000-Mile Maximum Care Warranty. Starts on the date of the CPOV sale, or at the expiration of the remaining 3/36 Basic New Vehicle Warranty.

A deductible may apply. See dealer for details or call 1-800-677-5782
Age/Mileage Eligibility 5 years / 75,000 miles
Lease Term Certified No
Point Inspection 125
Return/Exchange Program No
Roadside Assistance Yes
Special Financing Yes
Transferrable Warranty Yes
Warranty Deductible $100

Learn more about certified pre-owned vehicles

Printable Version

2002 Dodge Durango Sport Utility

Data on this page may have come in part, or entirely, from one or more of the following providers.

My Hotlist

Check up to 4 to Compare

Currently Viewing

Similar Models to Consider

Check up to 4 to Compare

Change your ZIP code: