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2000 Chevrolet Tracker Sport Utility

2dr Convertible 2WD

Starting at | Starting at 25 MPG City - 28 MPG Highway

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  • $13,975 original MSRP
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Printable Version

2000 Chevrolet Tracker Sport Utility

Printable Version

2000 Chevrolet Tracker Sport Utility

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2000 Chevrolet Tracker

Source: The Car Connection

Friendly as Fido, languid as a tortoise.

by Jill Amadio

Friendly as Fido, the unpretentious little Tracker sport-ute places its emphasis on the utility part of its vehicle classification: a practical, durable runabout that is infinitely easy to fit into parking places and bang around town in, with occasional forays into woods or desert. It's definitely to be treated as a member of the family that wants to please people, and needs no special care beyond feeding with fuel now and then.

Dramatically redesigned last year, the 2000 version has little new to add aside from a few metallic colors. Everyone was hoping to see a larger engine this year but Chevrolet will not budge from powering the Tracker with a 1.6-liter, four-cylinder until 2001. On the plus side, the 2.0-liter engine in my four-door test car, with 127 horsepower, passed muster on dirt trails in a national park but, with two-wheel drive, I wouldn't take it down into canyons to straddle boulders or ford the rapids although it has an eight-inch ground clearance and a steel fuel tank shield plate.

Weekend camping, yes, because this sturdy compact has cargo space for the basic needs if you don't bring a six-person tent or six persons, and in the middle of a meadow there's no one to whack when you open the tailgate door that swings out to the right. Downtown, you'd probably hit a pedestrian or two.

The four-wheel drive model has a shift-on-the-fly system that allows you to shift in and out at any speed below 60 mph. The two-speed transfer case has four-wheel low gearing that aids grip on uneven terrain. My tester had a four-speed automatic transmission, which costs extra. The standard is a five-speed manual with a fifth gear overdrive.

Speed isn't in the Tracker's vocabulary. While it grumbles along the freeway at 75 mph when pushed, it is most comfortable at a steady 60. Horsepower is rated at 127 ponies for the larger engine, and 97 with the base engine. Enough to get you where you're going if you're not in a hurry.

No carlike sissiness

One tends to denigrate small, economy SUVs. I've heard all manner of nasty remarks about most of the low-priced models but, taken for what it is, a small, serviceable SUV, the Tracker satisfies young people - its biggest market - who need a set of rugged-looking wheels in the tradition of an off-roader. The exterior is as trendy as this category gets, but if you opt for the surfer-styled Hang Ten Edition convertible ragtop you might feel you're driving something with a lot more flair.

Sides, roofline and front and rear on the hardtop version have a wagon-like look while the grille is way understated for an SUV. Rocker panel moldings on the lower body are welcome standard equipment to ward off flying debris while you're battling the elements or chipping through gravel.

Built on a full-length, ladder frame that acts as a foundation for supporting the body and powertrain, the Tracker is a true truck. None of this carlike sissiness, thank you, although it is easy to drive and handle mostly because the previous version's recirculating-ball steering has been replaced by a more precise power rack-and-pinion system. With a nice wide stance, 2.5 inches more than the 1998 model, and a new suspension that gives you a smoother ride, the driving experience provides a lot more confidence than its predecessor.

Inside, there's plenty of room to flap your elbows, and unless you wear a stovepipe hat, you'll find headroom for the most bouffant of hairstyles. The no-nonsense dash holds the usual suspects - audio, climate controls, gauges, and vents. Except I'd like to see a couple of them reversed. The air conditioning unit is placed above the radio, which means to change stations or fiddle with your tapes or CDs, you have to reach farther down than you'd like. Cupholders are a bit bizarre - square, rather than round. Chevrolet says it's easier to store french fries in a rectangular holder. Of course.

There's only one interior color throughout, gray, but it's a warm, light, unobtrusive shade. Seats are reclining buckets, cloth with vinyl, with a split rear bench that folds flat if you need extra space. Several storage nooks and crannies hold maps, sunglasses, flasks and books.

To make it livable, the Tracker still needs quite a bit of dressing up with $3000 or $4000 worth of extra equipment. For example, my model added several options including air conditioning, cruise control, tilt steering wheel, rear wiper/washer, automatic transmission with overdrive, anti-lock brakes, CD player, and a spare tire cover for a total of $3416 over the $15,150 price.

How safe is the Tracker? The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety recently tested it, compared to other small SUVs, and gave it an overall A (Acceptable) rating for front offset crashes at 40 miles an hour. Injury measurements to the head also earned an A, while injuries to the neck, chest, legs, and feet were rated G (Good). (A Good rating is best. Marginal and Poor are at the bottom of the ratings scale).

If you want to compare before you shop, the four-door Tracker's competitors include its twin sister, the Suzuki Vitara, and Toyota's RAV4, Jeep Wrangler, Isuzu Amigo, the Kia Sportage, the Subaru Forester and Honda's CR-V.

2000 CHEVROLET TRACKER

Price as tested: $18,966
Engine: 2.0-liter DOHC four-cylinder, 127 horsepower
Transmission: four-speed automatic
Wheelbase: 97.6 in
Length: 162.6 in
Width: 67.3 in
Height: 65.6 in
Weight: 2866 lb
Fuel economy: 24 city/26 hwy
Major standard features:
Dual airbags
Head restraints
Rear window defogger
AM/FM radio
Delayed off interior lighting
Cargo net and cargo area cover

© 2000 The Car Connection

Printable Version

2000 Chevrolet Tracker Sport Utility

Safety Features & Equipment

Braking & Traction

4-Wheel ABS Opt

Passenger Restraint

Driver Air Bag Std
Passenger Air Bag Std

Road Visibility

Daytime Running Lights Std
Intermittent Wipers Std
Variable Inter. Wipers Std
Printable Version

2000 Chevrolet Tracker Sport Utility

Original Warranty  help
Original Warranty
An original warranty is the warranty associated with a vehicle when it is brand new. In addition to the original warranty, select items, like tires, are typically covered by respective manufacturers. Also, an act of Federal law sometimes provides protection for certain components, like emissions equipment.
The original warranty is often broken down into multiple sections, including:
Basic Warranty:
Typically covers everything except for parts that wear out through normal use of the vehicle. Examples of non-covered items are brake pads, wiper blades and filters.
Drivetrain Warranty:
This warranty covers items the basic warranty does not protect. Wear and tear items such as hoses will not be covered, but key items like the engine, transmission, drive axles and driveshaft often will be.
Roadside Assistance:
The level of service differs greatly with this warranty, but many manufacturers offer a toll-free number that helps provide assistance in case you run out of gas, get a flat tire or lock your keys in the car.
Corrosion Warranty:
This warranty focuses on protecting you from holes caused by rust or corrosion in your vehicle's sheet metal.
Please check the owner's manual, visit a local dealership or look at the manufacturer's website to learn more about the specifics of the warranties that apply to a vehicle.

Basic 3 Years/36,000 Miles
Drivetrain 3 Years/36,000 Miles
Corrosion 6 Years/100,000 Miles
Roadside Assistance 3 Years/36,000 Miles

Chevrolet Certified Pre-Owned Warranty  help
Certified Pre-Owned Warranty
To be eligible for Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) status, vehicles generally must be recent models with relatively low mileage. CPO vehicles must also pass a detailed inspection, outlined by the manufacturer, which is measured by the number of inspected points.
Warranty coverage can vary from one manufacturer to the next. While most certified pre-owned programs transfer and extend the existing new car warranty terms, others offer a warranty that simply represents an additional year and mileage value. Always check with the manufacturer for the specific warranties they offer.
Common features and benefits of Certified Pre-Owned warranties include:
Age/Mileage Eligibility
To even be considered for certification, a car must be a recent model year and have limited mileage. The exact requirements are established by individual manufacturers.
Lease Term Certified
Some manufacturers offer certified pre-owned cars for lease. The length of the lease is often shorter than a new car lease, but it will cost you less.
Point Inspection
These inspections entail a comprehensive vehicle test to ensure that all parts are in excellent working order. The point inspection list is simply a numbered list of exactly what parts of the car are examined. While many inspections range from a 70- to 150-point checklist, most are very similar and are performed using strict guidelines. Ask your local dealer about specific details.
Return/Exchange Program
Some manufacturers offer a very limited return or exchange period. Find out if you will get the sales tax and licensing/registration fees back should you return or exchange the car.
Roadside Assistance
Most certified pre-owned programs offer free roadside service in case your car breaks down while still under warranty.
Special Financing
Reduced-rate loans are available through many certified pre-owned programs. Manufacturer-backed inspections and warranties help eliminate the risks involved with buying pre-owned, so buyers who qualify can take advantage of the great offers.
Transferable Warranty
When a new car warranty transfers with the certification of the car and remains eligible for the next owner, it is known as a transferable warranty. Once the original transferable warranty expires, an extended warranty takes effect.
Warranty Deductible
This is the amount for which you are responsible when repair work is performed under the warranty. Some manufacturers require a deductible while others don't, so always ask.

2-year/24,000-Mile¹ CPO Scheduled Maintenance Plan.

12-Month/12,000-Mile² Bumper-to-Bumper Limited Warranty.

5-year/100,000-Mile³ Powertrain Limited Warranty for model years up to 2014.

¹Covers only scheduled oil changes with filter, tire rotations and 27 point inspections, according to your vehicle's recommended maintenance schedule for up to 2 years or 24,000 miles, whichever comes first. Does not include air filters. Maximum of 4 service events. See participating dealer for other restrictions and complete details.

²Whichever comes first from date of purchase. See participating dealer for limited warranty details.

³Whichever comes first from original in-service date. See participating dealers for limited warranty details.
Age/Mileage Eligibility 2009-2014 model year / Under 75,000 miles
Lease Term Certified No
Point Inspection 172-Point Vehicle Inspection and Reconditioning
Download checklist
Return/Exchange Program 3-Day 150-Mile Satisfaction Guarantee
Roadside Assistance Yes
Transferrable Warranty Yes
Warranty Deductible $0

Learn more about certified pre-owned vehicles

Printable Version

2000 Chevrolet Tracker Sport Utility

Data on this page may have come in part, or entirely, from one or more of the following providers.

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