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1994 Buick Roadmaster Sedan

4dr Sedan Value Edition

Starting at | Starting at 0 MPG City - 0 MPG Highway

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  • $22,570 original MSRP

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Printable Version

1994 Buick Roadmaster Sedan

Printable Version

1994 Buick Roadmaster Sedan

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1994 Buick Roadmaster

Source: New Car Test Drive

Overview

Buick revived the Roadmaster nameplate in 1991, the automaker tapped into nostalgia for the fullthrottle, road-hogging prowess of the original Roadinaster that Buick retired in 1958. But the '91 Roadmaster Estate Wagon's 5-liter, 170-hp V8 engine-small for a 4,400-pound vehicle only kindled a sentimental yeaming for the engine muscle of the original.

We applaud Buick's decision to put a more powerful engine into the '94 Roadmaster Estate Wagon, giving this venerate nameplate the punch it deserves: Its 5.7-liter, 260-hp V8 engine, in a 4,572-pound wagon, evoked memories of cruising the main drag in dad's big 1960 Olds right after he had the bands tightened.

Our test wagon carried a base MSRP of $25,599 and had a $2,144 option package that included air conditioning, electronic climate and cruise control, heated outside mirrors, six-way power seats with armrests, programmable door locks, remote keyless entry, a cassette player and other amenities. Additional option items such as leather/vinyl front seat, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and the trailer-towing package brought the MSRP to $29,468.

Walkaround

The styling of the Estate Wagon is definitely a throwback to the hefty land cruisers that predated the 1973 energy crisis. Simultaneously elegant, functional and substantive, this is the vehicle you would buy if you owned a ranch or a construction company.

The slanted, wind-deflecting front hood and dramatically angled windshield of our Dark Cherry Metallic test vehicle revealed the extent of Buick's aerodynamic impulses: The roof-support pillars blended in with the front doors, which yielded a cleaner line and visual continuity. The sunroof was so expansive, it looked like it belonged on a railroad observation car. The luggage rack was solid but compact.

Another nod to bygone days was the copious amount of chrome that adomed the Estate Wagon-from the beefy bumpers and assertive side moldings to the ubiquitous door trim and inset door handles. One area of compromise, however, was the front grille, which was chrome-colored plastic.

Popping the hood was relatively easy, but when it was up, the tops of the headlights were exposed to allow an unimpeded view of the headlight wiring and other innards. Perhaps this access facilitates repair work, but a vehicle so well-appointed cries out for cosmetic headlight covers. The Inside Story

Entry into our Estate Wagon's cavernous front-seat area was aided by conveniently mounted leather straps that helped us close the wide doors. Easing into the wagon's plush leather/vinyl seats was akin to settling into a favorite leather chair. The six-way power seats could be operated even after the key was removed from the ignition.

Befitting such a comfort-oriented layout, all of the necessary power assists were ergonomically displayed on the driver's-door armrest-sparing the knuckle-scraping annoyance of reaching under the seat for such switches.

The analog-numbered dashboard was easy to read. We also appreciated the armrest-mounted lights that, when the doors were open at night, illuminated the ground below and alerted oncoming traffic to our open doors.

The pullout ashtray/coin tray/ cupholder unit jiggled a bit much for our taste, with about 3/4-inch of play. The cupholder in particular was so unsteady that had we tried to secure a cup of coffee there, we were sure we would have ended up with a puddle of hot liquid on the carpet.

The leather-rich seating was roomy enough for six adults. Even though Buick says the Roadmaster will carry eight, the rear-facing third seat is probably best reserved for kids.) Both the third and second seats folded down, providing 92.4 cubic feet of cargo space. The tailgate could open two different ways: down, to enable easy loading of large and heavy objects, or to the side like a car door for easy passenger entry and exit.

The Estate Wagon's child-safety lock ensured that the rear hatch could be opened only from the outside-an inconvenience if the rear seat was occupied by impatient adults, but a potential lifesaver if the aft occupants were curious children.

Interior Features

Entry into our Estate Wagon's cavernous front-seat area was aided by conveniently mounted leather straps that helped us close the wide doors. Easing into the wagon's plush leather/vinyl seats was akin to settling into a favorite leather chair. The six-way power seats could be operated even after the key was removed from the ignition.

Befitting such a comfort-oriented layout, all of the necessary power assists were ergonomically displayed on the driver's-door armrest-sparing the knuckle-scraping annoyance of reaching under the seat for such switches.

The analog-numbered dashboard was easy to read. We also appreciated the armrest-mounted lights that, when the doors were open at night, illuminated the ground below and alerted oncoming traffic to our open doors.

The pullout ashtray/coin tray/ cupholder unit jiggled a bit much for our taste, with about 3/4-inch of play. The cupholder in particular was so unsteady that had we tried to secure a cup of coffee there, we were sure we would have ended up with a puddle of hot liquid on the carpet.

The leather-rich seating was roomy enough for six adults. Even though Buick says the Roadmaster will carry eight, the rear-facing third seat is probably best reserved for kids.) Both the third and second seats folded down, providing 92.4 cubic feet of cargo space. The tailgate could open two different ways: down, to enable easy loading of large and heavy objects, or to the side like a car door for easy passenger entry and exit.

The Estate Wagon's child-safety lock ensured that the rear hatch could be opened only from the outside-an inconvenience if the rear seat was occupied by impatient adults, but a potential lifesaver if the aft occupants were curious children.

Driving Impressions

Aside from its power improvement over earlier versions, the modified engine features a new power-train control module that opens the fuel injectos sequentially to smooth out the idle and beef up performance. The result was a thrust-happy but luxurious ride, with acceleration comparable to a 250-pound linebacker who runs the 100-yard dash in 10 seconds.

When we hit the expressway, the Estate Wagon zoomed from 50 to 70 mph with velvety ease and still felt as though it had much more to give. Although the speedometer topped out at 120 mph, we felt this beast could hit a lot higher with minimal strain.

The Estate Wagon's standard heavy-duty suspension had us floating, even at high speeds. When we took a big S curve at 40 mph, the suspension grabbed the road confidently. Our test model had the optional, and highly recommended, limited-slip differential. At only $100, it delivered extra traction on icy roads.

New for '94 was the variable-assist steering previously available only on the Roadmaster Sedan. We darted in and out of traffic at 45 mph using only fingertip pressure, while at higher speeds, the steering tightened up accordingly. And just one finger was needed for a parallel-parking maneuver, during which the wagon's expansive windows afforded superior visibility.

Hitting the brakes while traveling at 65 mph, we could feel the weight, torque and engine muscle, but we also felt confident that the standard antilock brakes were more than capable of bringing this massive vehicle to a controlled stop.

Summary

The Buick Roadmaster Estate Wagon is a big, comfy throwback to the days when wagons were wagons, when gasoline was 35 cents a gallon and when carmakers didn't let a little thing like gas mileage keep them from bulking up a vehicle with generous amounts of chrome and weight. That's not to say the Roadmaster is a gas hog. For a wagon, the mileage is a respectable 17 mph in the city and 25 mph on the highway.

Stylish and well-appointed, the Roadmaster Estate Wagon will be a pleasure to drive, especially for everyone who remembers those carefree, energy-rich days.

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Printable Version

1994 Buick Roadmaster Sedan

Safety Features & Equipment

Braking & Traction

4-Wheel ABS Std

Passenger Restraint

Driver Air Bag Std
Passenger Air Bag Std

Road Visibility

Electrochromic Rearview Mirror Std
Intermittent Wipers Std

Security

Anti-theft System Std
Printable Version

1994 Buick Roadmaster Sedan

Buick Certified Pre-Owned Warranty  help
Certified Pre-Owned Warranty
To be eligible for Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) status, vehicles generally must be recent models with relatively low mileage. CPO vehicles must also pass a detailed inspection, outlined by the manufacturer, which is measured by the number of inspected points.
Warranty coverage can vary from one manufacturer to the next. While most certified pre-owned programs transfer and extend the existing new car warranty terms, others offer a warranty that simply represents an additional year and mileage value. Always check with the manufacturer for the specific warranties they offer.
Common features and benefits of Certified Pre-Owned warranties include:
Age/Mileage Eligibility
To even be considered for certification, a car must be a recent model year and have limited mileage. The exact requirements are established by individual manufacturers.
Lease Term Certified
Some manufacturers offer certified pre-owned cars for lease. The length of the lease is often shorter than a new car lease, but it will cost you less.
Point Inspection
These inspections entail a comprehensive vehicle test to ensure that all parts are in excellent working order. The point inspection list is simply a numbered list of exactly what parts of the car are examined. While many inspections range from a 70- to 150-point checklist, most are very similar and are performed using strict guidelines. Ask your local dealer about specific details.
Return/Exchange Program
Some manufacturers offer a very limited return or exchange period. Find out if you will get the sales tax and licensing/registration fees back should you return or exchange the car.
Roadside Assistance
Most certified pre-owned programs offer free roadside service in case your car breaks down while still under warranty.
Special Financing
Reduced-rate loans are available through many certified pre-owned programs. Manufacturer-backed inspections and warranties help eliminate the risks involved with buying pre-owned, so buyers who qualify can take advantage of the great offers.
Transferable Warranty
When a new car warranty transfers with the certification of the car and remains eligible for the next owner, it is known as a transferable warranty. Once the original transferable warranty expires, an extended warranty takes effect.
Warranty Deductible
This is the amount for which you are responsible when repair work is performed under the warranty. Some manufacturers require a deductible while others don't, so always ask.

2-Year/24,000-Mile1 CPO Scheduled Maintenance Plan.

12-Month/12,000-Mile2 Bumper-to-Bumper Limited Warranty.

5-year/100,000-Mile3 Powertrain Limited Warranty for model years up to 2012. 6-Year/100,000-Mile3 Powertrain Limited Warranty for 2013 model year and newer Certified Pre-Owned Buick vehicles (as of 6/24/13).

1Covers only scheduled oil changes with filter, tire rotations and 27 point inspections, according to your vehicle's recommended maintenance schedule for up to 2 years or 24,000 miles, whichever comes first. Does not include air filters. Maximum of 4 service events. See participating dealer for other restrictions and complete details.
2Whichever comes first from date of purchase. See participating dealer for limited warranty details.
3Whichever comes first from original in-service date. See participating dealers for limited warranty details.
Age/Mileage Eligibility 2009-2014 model year / Under 75,000 miles
Lease Term Certified No
Point Inspection 172-Point Vehicle Inspection and Reconditioning
Download checklist
Return/Exchange Program 3-Day 150-Mile Satisfaction Guarantee
Roadside Assistance Yes
Transferrable Warranty Yes
Warranty Deductible $0

Learn more about certified pre-owned vehicles

Printable Version

1994 Buick Roadmaster Sedan

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