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Hear Me Out: The Chrysler 200 Is a Great Used Car Value

I’m always fascinated by lists that show the fastest depreciating cars on the used market. These lists are basically cheat sheets for which vehicles give you the most bang for your buck based on how much value they’ve lost over a short timespan. One car that’s popped up on such a list is a midsize American sedan that seems to have left the market as suddenly as it arrived. I’m talking about the Chrysler 200.

I should clarify that I’m talking specifically about the second-generation 200 — the one that shares a platform with the current Jeep Cherokee and the Chrysler Pacifica, and only survived through model years 2015 to 2017. The 200 was short-lived not only because of the crossover craze, but because of its identity crisis stuck between volume car and luxury car. Was it competing with the Toyota Camry or the Lexus ES? No one was really sure, and the car faded away.

The 200 sometimes gets the same ridicule as its predecessor, the Chrysler Sebring. Now, I think few people other than Michael Scott would disagree that the Sebring deserves all of the mockery it receives, but I’m not so sure the second-gen 200 deserves the same treatment. In fact, I’ll even go so far as to say the most recent Chrysler 200 is a great used car value. Stay with me.

In a recent study, it was found that the Chrysler 200 loses a significant 48.4 percent of its value in just three years. That’s much faster depreciation than the industry average of about 35 percent in three years.

So, what does that mean for the actual prices of these cars? The 200 wasn’t that expensive when it was new — and now it’s a steal. Right now, there are more than 200 used second-gen Chrysler 200 models on Autotrader that can be had for less than $10,000. A handful of them are even the high-end 200C trim, which throws in heated leather seats, remote start, nice wheels and a bunch more.

You can get lots of decent cars for a 4-digit price tag, you’re probably thinking, so what’s so great about the Chrysler 200? I’m not going to pretend the 200 was the most cutting-edge or most competitive car in its class when it was new, but it’s a nice, plain car that can be optioned with pretty luxurious appointments for very little money. And one cool perk of the 200 is that it was available with all-wheel drive, which was a rarity in its segment at its price point. It could also be had with a V6, which not all of its competitors could say. It has an aesthetic that still looks modern today, and it’s reasonably roomy, fuel efficient and comfortable, making it a good (enough) daily driver for most normal people.

So the next time your mom asks you for a recommendation on what car she should get next, consider pointing her in the direction of a used second-gen Chrysler 200. It’s not going to blow anyone away, but it’s affordable, comfortable and a little more interesting than a Honda Accord.

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16 COMMENTS

  1. I bought the 2016 six months ago and so far, I am 1000% in love with this car. The way it looks, feels, drives, everything about it.  I don’t feel like I got “a good enough” deal, I feel like this car is a great deal. I’m no guru, but I know enough to know this car far surpasses the Sebring. 

  2. I got to hoon on a friends awd v6 model and it was decently quick and what he got options wise for the price was a steal (he got it 2 years old and 30k mi)

    He’s had it for like 4 years now almost and it’s got close to 100k and no issues.
  3. I actually own a 2015 200S AWD. Almost 60K miles and no issues. Yes, the tranny could be better, and I worry about it being reliable in the long run, but not because of FCA, but because the 9 speed is made by ZF, a German company. I worry about real world German reliability. But having said that, I like the pairing of the Pentastar with the 9 speed, even though shifting could be improved. 1st and 2nd are so low, and with how tall 8 and 9 are, I can get 35MPG on the highway. I like that the Pentastar is designed for 87 octane. I think it’s pretty decent to have a car that has almost 300HP, weighs 3800 lbs, and can return 35 MPG. The car, to me, does a little bit of everything, which is why I bought it in the first place. I’ve seen the issues other owners complain about, and haven’t suffered those gremlins. Could be that I don’t drive in stop and go traffic at all, but I haven’t suffered at all with owning one.

  4. Maybe it’s a local thing but searching New Mexico, southern Colorado and west Texas they certainly aren’t going for under $10k in any meaningful way. A loaded AWD C model (V6) with the premium safety package (lane departure assist, intel cruise control, etc) and 45k miles runs $17.5-18k at one end, and a FWD Limited model with the 4 banger will still run $11-12k here unless it’s way up there on mileage (75k+) at which point it might drop to 9-10k.

  5. I travel for work and rent a car pretty much every week. The Chrysler 200 is, quite simply, the worst car I have ever driven. I knew this almost as soon as I drove it off the lot. I had it for less than a day and returned it to trade it for something else. This was a pretty new one with not too many miles on it. It’s been a while, so I don’t remember specifically why I hated it so much. I just remember that driving it made me feel simultaneously angry and sad.

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