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Here’s Why McLaren Denied Part of My Warranty Claim

Imagine my heartbreak when I got a call from the McLaren dealer, giving good news that my repairs was completed — but then presenting me with a balanced owed! My bumper-to-bumper warranty had failed me, without my knowledge, until after the repairs were completed. In order for them to release the car, I had to pay the whopping bill, which totaled $41.20.

Obviously, I’m being dramatic, as my first trip to the dealer for repairs after the months long transmission replacement was pretty painless. I didn’t want to drive my McLaren all the way back to Kansas from Atlanta after my epic, week-long trip anyway — so dropping it off at the dealer to investigate non-functioning reverse lamps also doubled as free storage until the transporters could pick it up. I suspected some wiring might have come loose, as the panel holding the reverse lamp was removed to gain access to the transmission a few months ago — but it turns out the entire assembly had failed. This single part cost nearly $1,000, and with labor added, the repair has eaten up a quarter of the $4,000 warranty cost so far this year.

I thought I was getting free repairs and free storage (although I did pay for a detail, as well), but I got a surprise phone call from the dealer asking for another $41.20. Apparently, this was to cover some stripped bolts that needed to be replaced on the underbody panel — bolts that were likely stripped during the transmission replacement. The service advisor who I was working with was on vacation, so I couldn’t get the full scoop — and since my transporters were supposed to pick up the car in the next few days, I reluctantly paid the bill.

While that $41.20 charge was a surprise, I certainly wasn’t shocked that my other warranty claim was denied. It’s hard to believe, but my 6-figure supercar is rusting, with paint bubbling on the underside of the hood, and growing around where it touches the trunk seal. The hood as never been repaired or repainted before as far as I can tell — and I imagine it will eventually start showing through the paint. Sadly, my McLaren extended warranty only covers mechanical items, and the corrosion warranty for McLaren ended after 5 years — so my 2012 model is too old to qualify. Thankfully, the bonnet can easily be replaced — but the cheapest used hood I can find is over $2,000. 

Unfortunately, now that I’ve seen the rust, I can’t unsee it — and I imagine disclosing rust on a supercar would make resale pretty difficult. I’ll get it fixed eventually — but for now, I just want to enjoy my car. So far, it’s been at the McLaren dealer for repairs, or in transit from McLaren dealers for 74 days. I’ve owned the car for 119 days, which means I haven’t been in possession of the most expensive car I’ve ever owned because of repairs for 62 percent of the time. That’s sad — but I’m hoping for better luck this spring! Find a McLaren MP4-12C for sale

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