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I Sold My Nissan S-Cargo: 4 Months With a Weird Car

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author photo by Doug DeMuro February 2017

I recently sold my Nissan S-Cargo to a man in Kansas. I love the guy who bought it, because he plans to use it for its intended purpose: It will live out its life in northeastern Kansas as a pizza delivery vehicle. I truly and honestly couldn't think of a better place for it. Goodbye, little guy.

As I watched the shipper load my S-Cargo onto his trailer -- which was being pulled by a Ford Super Duty pickup and also contained a 1970s Dodge Van -- I realized I had been in this situation many times before, watching a shipper load up my old car for the very last time. Except for two or three situations, I've never really been disappointed. Usually, by the time I'm selling my car, I'm really done with it. The S-Cargo was no exception. But I really will miss the little guy.

I bought my Nissan S-Cargo in October, just four months ago, from Japanese Classics -- a dealer in Richmond, Virginia, that always has an amazing inventory of imported Japanese cars. Although I was very excited to debut it here on Oversteer, nobody ever really seemed to care about the little Japanese delivery vehicle with the funny name and the even funnier styling. In the end, I think I only wrote four or five articles about it, including this one.

But I, personally, loved the thing. Despite being a 25-year-old vehicle with a carburetor heading into a relatively cold Northeastern winter, my S-Cargo started up every single time I turned the key -- and that was often.

Even though I didn't make very many videos about the S-Cargo, I drove it quite frequently: Its small size and enormous windows made it the perfect errand-running car in the middle of Philadelphia, where I live. It could fit into any parking spot, and seemingly move past any obstacle, thanks to its narrow width. And its huge white slab sides meant nobody would ever question it if I parked it in a commercial loading zone -- even though I never got around to actually putting license plates on it; instead, I drove around for months with an expired paper temporary plate from Japanese Classics.

On the highway, it was a different story. I only drove the S-Cargo twice on trips longer than an hour -- both times to a cars and coffee event (where, truly, it gets mobbed more than any other car I've ever owned). Both times, I was the slowest guy in the slow lane; the guy who annoys professional truckers because they have to pass some idiot doing 63 miles per hour in a 65 zone. In my defense, it really started to feel uncomfortable above 65 or so -- and then there was that horrible chime you were always hearing when you crossed 60.

But that's not why I sold it. People often ask me why I bought a certain car, or why I sold a certain car, and the answer is always the same: because I buy these cars for my job. I write about them, I make videos about them, and if the readers and viewers aren't there, it's time for the car to go. Over the last 4 years, I've only kept one car: my daily driver SUV. Everything else has gotten the boot when the views started to slip -- and in the case of the S-Cargo, they were never there in the first place.

But anyway, the S-Cargo was a great city errand-runner, and that's exactly what it'll still do. It should enter pizza delivery service in Kansas fairly soon, and the new owner has told me he's going to allow designers to submit exterior graphic design suggestions on the website 99designs; I'll have more on that later.

In the meantime: Goodbye, sweet S-Cargo. If I had more space, I'd keep you. But you didn't belong cooped up in some garage in the city, accompanying me on post-office runs every few days. You should be running free, among the farms of Kansas, making people smile, and laugh, and wave, while carrying around massive amounts of pizza in your cargo area.

Doug DeMuro is an automotive journalist who has written for many online and magazine publications. He once owned a Nissan Cube and a Ferrari 360 Modena. At the same time.

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This image is a stock photo and is not an exact representation of any vehicle offered for sale. Advertised vehicles of this model may have styling, trim levels, colors and optional equipment that differ from the stock photo.
I Sold My Nissan S-Cargo: 4 Months With a Weird Car - Autotrader