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Will the Dodge Challenger Ever Be Redesigned?

I’m starting to wonder if the Dodge Challenger will ever be redesigned. If you weren’t aware, the current version of the Dodge Challenger has been on sale forever — and I mean that quite literally, as it’s been on sale for an amazing 13 years. That’s "forever" in the car world, to the point where it’s almost the oldest new car on sale.

And yet, the Challenger still brings big sales. Back in 2009, the Challenger’s first year on the market, it sold 25,900 units. In 2018, the Challenger’s 10th full year on the market, in a world obsessed with SUVs and trucks, the Challenger had its best year ever, moving 66,700 units. The Challenger has been out for a decade, and it’s only getting more popular.

Of course, there are a lot of reasons for this. One is the fact that, even though Chrysler hasn’t fully redesigned the Challenger, they’ve kept it tremendously modern with many technology updates over the years. They’re also releasing new versions constantly, continually keeping buyers coming back with more power, new models and special versions like the Hellcat, the Redeye, and the Demon. The Challenger very much has a magnetic personality.

But then there’s another major reason: the Challenger’s design. By borrowing from retro models, the Challenger will basically always look cool, since we essentially take for granted that 1960s muscle cars will always look cool. Given that, is there really even any need to change the Challenger? Why fix something that already looks so good, as proven by the fact that 1960s Dodge muscle cars have pretty much only become universally more acclaimed as time has gone on?

With this in mind, I truly suspect Chrysler won’t redesign the Challenger, but rather continue updating it to keep it fresh while retaining the current body style and basic design. It could become something of a Mercedes-Benz G-Wagen, continuing to harvest sales after years or decades on the market. Crazily enough, I actually suspect that may be precisely what happens to the Challenger — because, with sales only climbing, why fix what clearly isn’t broken? Find a Dodge Challenger for sale

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14 COMMENTS

  1. Dodge in 1974 made a huge mistake in canceling the Challenger. 

    I don’t think they are going to make the same mistake twice.
    IMHO the only redesign should be underneath the skin. Same body lines and drive train, updated chassis and suspension.
  2. While the Mustang and Camaro have been modernized, The Challenger still has it’s classic look! I never understood why so many brands walked away from Retro since it clearly sells! Not saying the new Camaro or Mustang don’t look good, The retro look truly is magnetic to so many craving a classic muscle car look.

  3. It has been slightly altered from its 2009 debut hasn’t it? The article stated that it’s been the same for the last 13 years. The headlights, front bumper, rear bumper and taillights, different spoiler options, as well as the length and width of the vehicle have are different on the 2015+ models. It’s fine the way it is…if only Dodge could figure out a way to just make it a bit lighter.


    • Length and width haven’t changed. You can take a 2018 Hellcat, and bolt everything into a 2011 Challenger and only the door panel pin holes have to be drilled, as the pin positions changed with the new interior. It has been done. The overall length slightly shortened in 2015 with the front and rear bumpers being pulled in to give it the shorter look, but wheelbase and track haven’t changed. Body panels swap. It’s still the same beautiful body. They’ve done suspension revisions, interior changes, widebodies, and many refinements, but the body is the same. I own an ’11 R/T and ’16 SRT.

    • Length and width haven’t changed. You can take a 2018 Hellcat, and bolt everything into a 2011 Challenger and only the door panel pin holes have to be drilled, as the pin positions changed with the new interior. It has been done. The overall length slightly shortened in 2015 with the front and rear bumpers being pulled in to give it the shorter look, but wheelbase and track haven’t changed. Body panels swap. It’s still the same beautiful body. They’ve done suspension revisions, interior changes, widebodies, and many refinements, but the body is the same. I own an ’11 R/T and ’16 SRT.

  4. 800lb Gorilla is that Dodge/Chrysler will end up folding and Fiat will sell off the two valuable assets they have in Jeep and Ram and leave the market, or only keep Alfa and Maserati here as higher end brands. 

  5. I’ve driven all three of the pony cars quite a bit and all of the versions.  For pure juvenile fun, the Challenger wins hands down.  The Camaro’s pathetic livability finds it at the bottom.

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Doug Demuro
Doug DeMuro writes articles and makes videos, mainly about cars. Doug was born in Denver, Colorado, and received an economics degree from Emory University in Atlanta. After graduation, Doug spent three years working for Porsche Cars North America. Eventually, he quit his job to become a writer, largely because it meant that he no longer had to wear pants. Doug’s work has been featured in a... Read More

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