Car Buying

Buying a Car: Why You Might Want to Avoid a Sporty Car

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author photo by Doug DeMuro October 2015

Although it might seem appealing to replace your current car with a sporty new model, there are a few reasons why it might not be as enjoyable as you think to own a high-performance car. We've listed those reasons below to help drivers understand exactly what they're getting when buying a car with high-performance capabilities.

Expensive Parts

One reason you might not want to own a high-performance car is that parts are usually more expensive than they are on a normal vehicle. This is because high-performance cars usually use unique engines and designs, which means they can't share parts with other models as easily. The result is that parts -- and therefore repairs -- are often more expensive in sporty cars than run-of-the-mill daily vehicles.

Expensive Everything, Really

And it isn't just parts. Tires are usually more expensive for performance cars because they use more rubber than regular models, and they often require special rubber compounds to maximize performance. Insurance is more expensive, too, due to a higher chance of being involved in an accident when you own a more powerful car. And your fuel costs will likely go up when you buy a performance car because of its larger engine and extra power. Of course, there's also one more cost to consider: the fines you may incur from increased speeding tickets while driving a more powerful vehicle.

Rough Ride

Drivers especially interested in ride comfort should avoid a sports car. While some models offer plush, cushy rides, many more are far harsher than a traditional sedan or SUV -- a function of the fact that sports cars often use stiff suspension designed to improve cornering and decrease body roll. If you can't tolerate the idea of feeling every bump in the road, you should probably stay away from sports cars.

Lots of Attention

While some drivers enjoy attention, you may not be prepared for exactly how much you'll get if you choose certain low-slung sports cars such as a Chevy Corvette or a Lotus Elise -- especially if you get one of those models in bright colors. Expect attention at gas stations, in parking lots and even when you're just sitting at a traffic light -- so much that you may get tired of all the attention after a while.

Practicality

One item you probably haven't overlooked when it comes to buying a new sports car is practicality -- but it's still worth mentioning. Virtually no sports cars offer family-friendly practicality, and ones that do still have trouble matching even a regular sedan, let alone an SUV or minivan. If you need a family car, you won't want to consider any sort of performance vehicle.

Our Take

If you're interested in buying a car with high-performance capabilities, you may want to think twice. We've listed many of the reasons why -- including limited practicality, a rough ride, additional expenses and over-the-top attention. If you don't mind those potential drawbacks, you might be ready for a sports car. If you do, you might want to consider something a little more practical instead.

This image is a stock photo and is not an exact representation of any vehicle offered for sale. Advertised vehicles of this model may have styling, trim levels, colors and optional equipment that differ from the stock photo.
Buying a Car: Why You Might Want to Avoid a Sporty Car - Autotrader