The Lamborghini Diablo Is Still Too Cheap

I really think the Lamborghini Diablo is too cheap. It’s hard to say that about a car where the only example listed for sale on Autotrader is offered for $179,988, but I really think it’s true: The Lamborghini Diablo — and specifically the early Lamborghini Diablo models, sold from 1991 to 1998 — is just too cheap.

Here’s what I mean. Back when I was in college, you could pick up a really worn, used Lamborghini Countach for around $90,000, and you could pick up a decent, driveable example for roughly $150,000. These days, the cheapest Countach models you’ll see for sale are listed for $225,000, with nice ones asking $400,000 or more.

Same deal with the Miura: It’s always been an icon, but I remember when $600,000 was considered "sale-proof" for the car — a number nobody would ever pay for a used Lamborghini. Now, Miura models can bring $1 million at auction, and certain special examples can bring a lot more than that.

Which brings me back to the Diablo. I’ve always felt that the Diablo is one of the craziest-looking Lamborghini models, truly on par with the Countach, especially when you see it in person. But an early Diablo can be purchased for $150,000 to $200,000, which makes it one of the least expensive Lamborghini models, short of unloved low-end vehicles from years past, like the Jalpa and the Urraco. The Diablo was no Jalpa or Urraco: It was a flagship model with a mid-engine V12, and I suspect the styling will only become more revered as the car ages.

As a result, I really think the Diablo is undervalued. Not later examples, interestingly, as the Audi-developed Diablo 6.0 is selling for huge money, with many examples listed on Autotrader for well over $300,000. But the early Diablo models, the pure examples, seem to be way cheaper than they should be. To me, this is a $200,000 to $250,000 car, and it should be nipping at the heels of the Countach — but instead, it’s basically half price.

Now, I’m not telling you to go out and pick up a used Diablo because I think it’s a great investment — after all, we know it’ll be difficult to drive, expensive to own and challenging to service. But I do think there will be a time when you look back on the Diablo, selling for many multiples of its current price, and think: I could’ve had that when it was "only" $150,000. And indeed, right now, you still can.

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