Search Cars for Sale

2020 Ford Transit Connect Review

Versatile and capable, the 2020 Ford Transit Connect is easier to maneuver and park than its larger stablemate, the Ford Transit. This makes both the Cargo Van and Passenger Wagon versions ideal for urban chores. As a people carrier, the Wagon provides a somewhat stiffer ride than a minivan but looks more butch and offers loads of cargo room. Ford ensured that even the entry-level XL trim of the Wagon and Van are nicely contented.

What’s New for 2020?

New for 2020, Ford Co-Pilot360 is standard on the Transit Connect XLT Cargo Van and the Transit Connect XLT and Titanium Passenger Wagon. It’s optional on the XL versions of both the Cargo Van and the Wagon. Features include blind spot alert with cross-traffic alert, lane-keeping assist and adaptive cruise control. Automatic head lamps and configurable daytime running lights are now standard on all trim levels, as well as rain-sensing windshield wipers. See the 2020 Ford Transit Connect models for sale near you

What We Like

  • Small and nimble package
  • Reasonably priced
  • Two wheelbase lengths for the Cargo Van
  • Suite of safety/driver-assist features standard on upper trims

What We Don’t

  • Lower trim levels are sparsely equipped
  • So-so fuel economy
  • No slide or recline function for the Wagon’s second-row seats

How Much?

$25,570-$27,995 (Cargo Van), $28,315-$33,505 (Passenger Van)

Fuel Economy

Ford provides a turbocharged 2.0-liter 4-cylinder engine with auto stop/start as the standard mill for the Transit. It generates 150 horsepower and 144 lb-ft of torque. It’s mated to a new 8-speed automatic transmission. All versions of the Transit Connect are front-wheel drive.

The Environmental Protection Agency estimates fuel consumption at 24 miles per gallon in the city, 27 mpg on the highway and 25 mpg in combined driving.

Standard Features & Options

The 2020 Ford Transit Connect Van and Wagon are versions of the same vehicle. The Wagon is a passenger vehicle based on the Cargo Van, but with full windows all around, dual sliding side doors and a choice of rear cargo doors (that open 180 degrees) or a tailgate. Ford offers it in only the long-wheelbase (120.6-in) configuration with three rows of seating for up to seven. Both the second-row and third-row seats fold flat and can be removed. The Wagon comes in XL, XLT and Titanium grades.

The Cargo Van comes in two wheelbases: regular wheelbase at 104.8 inches and extended wheelbase 120.6 inches. Both seat two. The extended-wheelbase version is a $1,000 upcharge from the regular wheelbase. Ford offers both wheelbases in XL and XLT trims.

All pricing includes the $1,295 factory delivery charge.

The XL’s (Cargo Van $25,570, Passenger Wagon $28,315) standard equipment includes 16-in steel wheels, six airbags, hill-start assist, remote keyless entry, rain-sensing wipers, cruise control, power windows, a fold-flat front passenger seat, vinyl upholstery and floor covering, a tilt-and-telescopic steering wheel, configurable daytime running lights, auto on/off headlights, a capless fuel filler, two 12-volt outlets, FordPass Connect with 4G LTE Wi-Fi hot spot capability, Bluetooth connectivity, Precollision Assist with emergency braking, a rearview camera and a 4-speaker audio system with a 4.2-in display and an auxiliary input. In addition to this standard equipment, the Wagon adds front dual-zone auto climate control, seating for six, rear manual climate controls, rear parking sensors, integrated spotter mirrors and a center console with 110-volt power point.

The XLT (Cargo Van $27,995, Passenger Wagon $30,430) has power-heated/power-folding outboard mirrors, fog lights, Ford MyKey with programmable usage restrictions, a center console (Cargo Van), cloth upholstery, a 6-way manually adjustable driver’s seat, SYNC 3 with a 6.5-in touchscreen, satellite radio capability, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, wireless phone charging, voice control, a rearview camera and Co-Pilot360 with blind spot alert, cross-traffic alert, lane-keeping assist and adaptive cruise control. To add to this, the Wagon also gets carpeted floor covering, an upgraded center console and six audio speakers.

The Titanium (Passenger Wagon $33,505) brings LED fog lights, power-folding side mirrors, leather upholstery, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, push-button start, seating for six, an upgraded infotainment system with navigation, HID headlights and heated front seats.

Some of the higher-end standard features are available as options on lesser models. Other options — depending on trim and configuration — include navigation, a fixed panoramic sunroof, lane-keeping assist, blind spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert, a satellite/HD radio and front parking sensors.

In the short-wheelbase version, cargo space measures 77.1 cu ft. Long-wheelbase versions can accommodate 104.2 cu ft. of cargo space behind the front seats. Behind the Wagon’s second row, it’s 58.9 cu ft. With the third row set as far forward as it will go, there’s 19.8 cu ft. When it’s moved back as far as possible for legroom, there’s 15.7 cu ft.

In the Wagon, the back seats fold down to form a completely flat load floor.

Safety

Standard safety features include anti-lock brakes, hill-start assist, stability control, front-seat side airbags and side-curtain airbags for each seating row. Ford’s Curve Control is also standard. This feature is essentially a more sophisticated form of stability control, where it can cut engine power and apply the brakes automatically if necessary. Rear-parking assist is standard in the XL Wagon and higher trims. Ford’s Co-Pilot360 with blind spot alert, cross-traffic alert, lane-keeping assist and adaptive cruise control is standard in XLT of the Wagon and Van and the Titanium Wagon. It is optional on the XL grade.

In government crash tests, the Transit Connect Wagon received four out of five stars for rollover crashes. That’s the only third-party crash test that has been performed on any version of the Transit Connect.

Behind the Wheel

The 2020 Transit Connect’s dashboard consists of no-nonsense materials, and its tidy control layout is similar to the discontinued Focus. Equipment levels range from moderate in the XL to almost lavish in the Titanium, which provides many convenience features for family-minded buyers. The second and third rows of seats have sensible contours, and the tall roof means plenty of headroom in all seating positions.

Ride and handling feel agile and composed. However, some bigger road bumps will be felt and heard in the cabin.

Other Cars to Consider

2020 Mercedes-Benz Metris Passenger Van — Bigger and more expensive, but still a useful, well-judged size and perfectly capable. Now comes with the choice of a longer wheelbase.

2020 Ram ProMaster City Wagon/Tradesman — Also based on a European van, with class-leading power. No option for a third row, though.

2020 Nissan NV200 — Built on the same platform as the Nissan Sentra compact sedan, the NV200 is another major competitor to the Transit Connect Cargo Van. Pricing is lower, but the NV200 is also smaller than both the ProMaster City and the Transit Connect.

Used Toyota Sienna — Spacious, comfortable and more family friendly. It’s also the only minivan to offer all-wheel drive.

Autotrader’s Advice

If fitting the 2020 Ford Transit Connect into your budget is a primary concern, we suggest going with the XL and then turning to the options list to upgrade to cloth seating and SYNC 3. Otherwise, we’d go with the XLT. Find a Ford Transit Connect for sale

Sign up for Autotrader newsletters

The best cars and best deals delivered to your inbox

Email Address 

By subscribing, you agree to our privacy policy

Where You Can Buy

Loading dealers...

Leave a Comment

Most Popular Articles

2020 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid: First Look

The 2020 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid jumps to the head of the hybrid class.

Best Truck Deals: February 2021

These are the best deals on trucks for the month of February.

More Articles Like This