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Video | The LaFerrari Is the $3.5 Million Ultimate Ferrari

I recently had the chance to drive a LaFerrari, which was a truly amazing experience. As you probably know, the LaFerrari is the holy grail: the latest and greatest Ferrari supercar in the brand’s long line of modern supercars that now goes back five models, to the 288 GTO in the mid-1980s. The LaFerrari is the newest, and the best, and the craziest, and the most advanced, and I’ve driven it.

Here’s how I came to drive the LaFerrari: I borrowed it from a person named David Lee. David is a well-known Ferrari collector who has all five supercars — the 288 GTO, the F40, the F50 and the Enzo are the others — and he contacted me asking if I wanted to do a video on the LaFerrari. I, of course, did. So I met him at his garage, and we took the LaFerrari out.

In the video above, I drive the car and I point out its wonderful quirks and features — and you can watch the video and check out all that stuff. But here, I’d like to focus a bit more on the car’s driving experience, which was absolutely fabulous.

First, a quick overview: the LaFerrari has a 6.3-liter V12 with a hybrid component. It makes something like 940 horsepower and 665 lb-ft of torque, and it’s truly, ridiculously unbelievable. The market price on these things is somewhere around $3 million, which is more than double the new cost. Needless to say, I was a bit nervous to get it out on public roads, next to people in Dodge Grand Caravans and Jeep Patriots.

But I did get it out on public roads, with David as my passenger, and I quickly discovered it was a total blast — no surprise, given all the hype and the crazy price tag. The LaFerrari is so monstrously, insanely, ridiculously fast that you can hardly react to anything when you floor the accelerator. I did floor it, twice or three times, and the speed comes on at a truly unbelievable rate. It’s faster than any roller coaster I’ve ever been on, any airplane experience I’ve ever had. And the noise is so massive that it feels faster than cars like the Bugatti Chiron, which I’ve also driven. That is more of a luxury experience, while this is more pure, unadulterated speed, like the Porsche 918 Spyder.

Cornering, too, was amazing. The LaFerrari feels so unbelievably stable that it’s hard to put in words that relate to normal cars. There’s absolutely no body roll, the steering is so precise that there is zero lag between the moment you begin to turn the wheel and the moment things begin to happen, and the car is just ready for all-out handling and cornering at any opportunity. I can’t remember ever driving a car with quite this kind of steering feel — it’s just fantastically sharp and quick and it makes other Ferrari models seem a bit slow by comparison.

Of course, there’s also the sheer insanity of the whole thing. Other drivers notice, of course, but also you notice that you’re driving something a bit more special than the usual car, or even the usual exotic car — it’s low, and wide, sure, but you also have these ridiculous mirrors that stick up from the doors, and you’re sitting in these fixed racing seats, and everything is just a bit more "special" when you’re in a LaFerrari.

Everything is also a bit more worrisome. Interestingly, when I drive cars like the LaFerrari, I often don’t think about the cost — I’m more worried about getting an enjoyable driving experience or being able to accurately impart my feelings to the camera, since I’m trying to narrate the driving experience while I’m driving along. In this case, I felt roughly the same — but you’re always a bit more nervous in a $3 million car than in practically anything else. Is that person going to see me? Is he going to change into my lane? You have to constantly drive like everyone else is going to kill you — because if you damage a $3 million car, someone probably will.

And that’s probably one of the main reasons why nobody is driving their LaFerraris. If you go on Autotrader, you’ll see about a half-dozen listed, all with delivery miles. People who bought them new paid $1.5 million and watched their car double in value. People buying them now have a $3 million asset. Basically, nobody is driving these things. But David is, and he takes it out with surprising regularity considering its value, and considering how mileage can affect that value. I asked him about this, and he explained that the decrease in value is offset by his enjoyment in driving the car — and after spending some time behind the wheel, I completely understand the sentiment. Find a Ferrari LaFerrari for sale

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